Monthly Archives: July 2019

How Do I Keep Leaves Out of My Window Well?

Yardwork is never over. As the seasons change, as your needs and family change, and as you try new landscaping you will need to get out there and work on your lawn. Weeding, mowing, planting, fertilizing, watering, and just plain enjoying your yard is a year-round job. But is there a way to keep your yard work at a minimum? 

One annoying task in your yard is cleaning out your window wells. Keeping your window wells clean is critical not only for the cleanliness and order of your home but also for safe entry and exit of your home in the event of an emergency.

In addition, you need to keep your window wells clean to prevent damage to your home’s foundation and windows. Unfortunately, all of the other elements of your yard will find their way into your window well eventually.

How can you minimize the leaves, grass clippings, branches, trash, dirt, rocks, kids toys, and other debris getting into your window well?

1. Regularly Maintain Your Landscaping

You’re more likely to discover debris in your window well if you irregularly maintain your yard work. Allowing things to build up and become overgrown is harmful to your entire yard, and can also make the accumulation of debris in your window well a much bigger battle. Take care of weeds and growth weekly if possible, and clean out your window wells at least once per season even if it doesn’t look like there’s much debris that has fallen down there.

2. Adjust Landscaping

You can prevent leaves and foliage from getting into your window well altogether by carefully planning or adjusting your landscaping. Move brushy plants away from window wells or use landscaping retaining walls to keep the foliage from drifting. Trim and carefully stake any plants near your window wells to keep them contained.

3. Watch Edging

Regularly monitor the edges of your window wells. Through precipitation and general settling, you may find that the edges of your window well which once were a few inches above ground are now below the surface. Level out the ground around your window well and give it plenty of clearance to prevent runoff from falling into your window well.

4. Get a Window Well Cover

The easiest way to keep your window wells clean is to get a window well cover. Grated styles will still allow some debris into your window well, but a fine mesh or small weave grate will prevent most leaves and larger objects from falling into your window well. A bubble window well cover can cover the entire opening of the window well, preventing anything from entering your window well and making your job much easier.

Although it may be a hassle, cleaning out your window wells and keeping them clean will make a huge difference in the safety and security of your home, as well as preventing long term damage and future work. 

   

How To Replace a Window Well

Having windows in a basement is a great addition to any home since it can increase the light and airflow in an otherwise dark and stale area.

Furthermore, windows in a basement can keep you safe by affording you another exit or entrance in the event of a disaster or danger.

That’s one reason it is absolutely critical to keep your window wells free and clear of debris so that an exit is possible. But what if there’s something functionally wrong with your window well? 

It can happen. Even sturdy window wells can be damaged by landscaping, construction, shifting earth, or just long spells of wear and tear. From time to time a window well will need to be replaced, especially if you live in an older home.

Today Windowell Expressions will walk you through the necessary steps to replacing your window well. 

1. Dig Space

ig up the area surrounding the window well. It can be helpful to cut your turf or sod and place it carefully all together, then to place dirt and gravel in separate buckets or wheelbarrows. You want to create plenty of space to maneuver the old window well out and to place the new window well into the slot. Always dig away more than you expect, and don’t forget that the existing window well needs to go 8-10 inches deeper than the bottom of your window frame.

2. Remove Existing Window Well

Carefully inspect your window well to determine how it has been secured to the home. Screws or bolts can be loosened or pried off with a crowbar. Go slow and steady to loosen the window well, then recycle properly. Remove adhesive and repair any damage to your exterior wall at this point so that you can securely attach the new window well.

3. Gravel

You will need about 4 inches deep of gravel to perform adequate drainage for your window well. You will probably need to remove existing gravel that has accumulated debris and blockage in order to properly drain the area and prevent water pooling and flooding.

4. Insert New Window Well

Your new window well should go 8 inches below the bottom of your window and rise 4-6 inches above ground level. These measurements will prevent damage and water problems. When you’re sure the new window well will fit, carefully secure it using hardware or adhesive.

5. Seal

Adding caulk or other sealants will prevent water damage or loosening of your window well over time. Follow the manufacturer recommendations and ask our window well experts at Windowell Expressions if you aren’t sure what to use.

6. Backfill and Finish

Pour retained dirt back around the outside of the window well until the soil is securely packed in and the sod or grass is replaced. The window well should be secure and unmoving.

 

If you have questions about the state of your window well, ways to make your window well safer or more attractive, or if you need to replace an old window well for better function or curb appeal, Windowell Expressions would love to help.